Publicaciones

Midot, que atiende a más de 2,000 empresas en 33 países del mundo, es un socio óptimo para garantizar la integridad de sus empleados.

  • Blumen, S., Bayona, H., Givoli, S., Pecker, G., & Fine, S. (2017). Validation Study of a Multi-Method Integrity Test in a Peruvian Sample. Revista de Psicología, 35(1), 347-370.

    The present study summarizes the validity of a multi-method integrity test developed to measure integrity and counterproductive work behaviors (CWB) in personnel selection of a Peruvian sample. This instrument has been thoroughly studied in other cultural contexts, establishing its validity in predicting counter-productive behaviors. In order to study external validity, two criteria were used: (a) The Counterproductive Work Behavior Checklist (CWB-C) and (b) a supervisor evaluation questionnaire. The criterion validity of the Peruvian Spanish version was studied with a sample of 194 employed students, 86 male (44.3%) and 108 (55.7%) female. Participants were recruited from a large private Peruvian university. The instrument’s overall score correlated with self-reported CWB (r= -.62, p < .05). Female participants reported higher scores than male participants on the Attitudes (U (193) = 3842.5, p

  • Fine, S., Goldenberg, J., & Noam, Y. (2016). Beware of Those Left Behind: Counterproductive Work Behaviors Among Non-promoted Employees and the Moderating Effect of Integrity. Journal of Applied Psychology, 101(12), 1721-1729.

    Promotion decisions focus primarily on the successes of those selected, with surprisingly little attention given to the outcomes of those rejected. Negative emotional reactions among rejected candidates, for example, may motivate retaliations against the organization in the form of counterproductive work behaviors (CWBs). Indeed, in a sample of 568 military officer training candidates, we found a greater incidence of CWB among rejected versus accepted candidates, which peaked within 6 months after promotion decisions were made (d = .44) and gradually decreased thereafter. We also found that overt integrity moderated the relationship between promotion decisions and CWB, whereby rejected candidates with high levels of integrity engaged in less CWB than did rejected candidates with low integrity. Practical implications for mitigating CWB in cases of nonpromotion and considerations for more accurately evaluating the utility of promotion decisions are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record.

  • Evers, A., McCormick, C.M., Hawley,L.R., Muñiz, J., Balboni, G., Bartram, D., Boben, D., Egeland, J., El-Hassan, K., Fernández-Hermida, J.R., Fine, S., Frans, Ö., Gintiliené, G., Hagemeister,C., Halama, P., Iliescu, D., Jaworowska, A., Jiménez, P., Manthouli, M., Matesic, K., Michaelsen, L., Mogaji, A., Morley-Kirk, J., Rózsa, S., Rowlands, L., Schittekatte, M., Sümer, H.C., Suwartono, T., Urbánek, T., Wechsler, S., Zelenevska, T., Zanev, S., & Zhang, J. (2016). Testing Practices and Attitudes Toward Tests and Testing: An International Survey. International Journal of Testing, 1-33.

    On behalf of the International Test Commission and the European Federation of Psychologists’ Associations a world-wide survey on the opinions of professional psychologists on testing practices was carried out. The main objective of this study was to collect data for a better understanding of the state of psychological testing worldwide. These data could guide the actions and measures taken by ITC, EFPA, and other stakeholders. A questionnaire was administered to 20,467 professional psychologists from 29 countries. Five scales were constructed relating to: concern over incorrect test use, regulations on tests and testing, internet and computerized testing, appreciation of tests, and knowledge and training relating to test use. Equivalence across countries was evaluated using the alignment method, four scales demonstrated acceptable levels of invariance. Multilevel analysis was used to determine how scores were related to age, gender, and specialization, as well as how scores varied between countries. Although the results show a high appreciation of tests in general, the appreciation of internet and computerized testing is much lower. These scales show low variability over countries, whereas differences between countries on the other reported scales are much greater. This implies the need for some overarching improvements as well as country-specific actions.

  • Fine, S., & Pirak, M. (2016). Faking fast and slow: Within-person response time latencies for measuring faking in personnel testing. Journal of Business and Psychology, 31(1), 51-64. 2016 Editor Commendation Award.

    Purpose Item response time (RT) latencies offer a potentially promising approach for measuring faking in personnel testing, but have been studied almost exclusively as either long or short RTs relative to group norms. As such, the ability to reliably assess faking RTs at the individual level remains a challenge. To address this issue, the present study set out to examine the usefulness of a within-person difference score index (DSI) method for measuring faking, in which «control question» (baseline) RTs were compared to «target question» RTs, within single test administrations. Design/Methodology/Approach Two hundred six participants were randomly selected to simulated faking or honest testing conditions, and were administered two types of integrity test items (overt and personality), whereby group classification (faking/honest) served as the main dependent variable. Findings Faking condition RDs were longer than honest condition RDs for both item types (overt: d = .43; personality: d = .47), and overt item RTs were slightly shorter than personality item RTs in both testing conditions (honest: d = .34; faking: d = .41). Finally, using a sample cut score, the DSI correctly classified an average of 26% more cases of faking, and 53% less false positives, compared to the traditional normative method. Implications The results suggest that the DSI can be an advantageous method for identifying faking in personnel testing scenarios. Originality/Value This is the one of the first studies to propose a practical method for identifying individual-level faking RTs within single test administrations. Keywords Faking – Reaction time – Within person – Integrity – Selection

  • Pecker, G., & Fine, S. (2015). Using exit surveys to assess counterproductive work behaviors: A case study. Psychological Reports, 116(1), 89-96.

    Tziner, Fine, and Birati (2014) recognize the imperative need for utility models to help organizations realize the economic impact of human resource management (HRM) practices. They correctly note, however, that recent advancements in HRM practices, such as those designed to develop employee well-being and its metrics, have not been readily integrated into utility models. Along a similar vein, another metric that has become ubiquitous in recent years, but which has also not been well integrated into utility models, is employee integrity.

  • Fine, S. (2014). Further “tempering hard times”: Integrating integrity metrics into utility analyses. Industrial and Organizational Psychology: Perspectives on Science and Practice, 7(4), 576-579.

    Tziner, Fine, and Birati (2014) recognize the imperative need for utility models to help organizations realize the economic impact of human resource management (HRM) practices. They correctly note, however, that recent advancements in HRM practices, such as those designed to develop employee well-being and its metrics, have not been readily integrated into utility models. Along a similar vein, another metric that has become ubiquitous in recent years, but which has also not been well integrated into utility models, is employee integrity.

  • Fine, S. (2014). Faking in psychological testing: What we know today. [in Hebrew]. Psychoactualia: Journal of the Israeli Psychological Association, May, 22-29

    שאלוני אישיות מהווים אחד הכלים הרווחים ביותר במיון עובדים ברחבי העולם )1999., al et Ryan ,)וקיים מערך רחב ומבוסס של מחקרי תוקף מטה-אנליטיים התומך בכלים אלה ובפופולריות הרבה שלהם )2005, Mount & Barrick .)אף על פי כן, הפוטנציאל לזיוף בשאלוני אישיות נותר בעינו והוא מהווה בעיה מרכזית עבור חוקרים ויועצים בתחום.

  • Fine, S. (2014). Faking in personality assessments as a concept in psychometric theory [in Hebrew]. Bulletin of the Israeli Psychometric Association, 15, 10-12.

  • Sulea, C., Fine, S., Fischmann, G., Sava, F. A., & Dumitru, C. (2013). The moderating effects of personality on the relationship between abusive supervision and counterproductive work behaviors. Journal of Personnel Psychology, 12(4), 196-200.

    While counterproductive work behaviors (CWB) are considered to be associated with both personal and situational antecedents, the relationship between these two factors is not entirely understood. Toward a better understanding of this issue, the present study examined the moderating effects of personality traits on the relationship between a specific situational stressor, abusive supervision, and organization-targeted counterproductive behaviors (CWB-O). The results found significant main effects for both abusive supervision and personality, as expected, as well as a significant interaction between them, whereby employees with low scores in conscientiousness, agreeableness, and/or emotional stability were more likely to engage in CWB-O in response to abusive behaviors from their supervisors.

  • Fine, S., & Gottleib-Litvin, G. (2013). Justifying counterproductive work behaviors and an integrity-based conditional reasoning test: Back to the drawing board? International Journal of Selection and Assessment, 21(3), 328-333.

    Conditional reasoning tests (CRT) were proposed as an innovative approach to implicitly measure the rationalizations toward counterproductive work behaviors (CWB) often associated with overt integrity tests. The authors first set out to map a typology of justification mechanisms for general CWB, and to then validate a new integrity‐based CRT in both honest and faking testing conditions. Unfortunately, while demonstrating encouraging construct and criterion validity in the honest testing condition, the test was less resistant to faking than originally anticipated, and ceased to be valid in the faking condition. Overall, the results provide theoretical insight toward understanding how employees justify CWB, but raise concerns regarding the potential operational limitations of at least some CRTs.